Our Donors

Joe W. Forehand Jr. Endowed Scholarships in Engineering

Joe W. Forehand Jr. Endowed Scholarships in Engineering

A conversation with Joe W. Forehand, Jr.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
Because my experience at Auburn enabled me to achieve my dreams, I want to enable future Auburn scholars to achieve their dreams.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
I was the first generation of my family to attend college. I met my wife Gayle at Auburn, and we remain happily married with two sons, their spouses, as well as five grandchildren. I completed a 34-year career with Accenture, ultimately becoming Chairman and CEO. I attribute whatever success I have had to a very supportive family and an attitude that learning never stops.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
Although it no longer exists, one of my favorite traditions was the “Wreck Tech” parade when we played Georgia Tech. Auburn transformed me from an 18-year-old kid to a graduate engineer, confident in taking on the world. Although hard to describe, Auburn creates such a “family” environment. No matter where in the world I am, a “War Eagle” is always forthcoming if you spot an alum. The Auburn Creed is such a wonderful and simple way to think about Auburn values. Having completed an eight-year term on the Auburn University Foundation Board, I have been able to witness the success of Auburn talent and their spirit and willingness to give back to Auburn: “Because This is Auburn.”

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
First, I hope they gain some financial flexibility to get a more rewarding Auburn experience—academically, socially, spiritually—to become leaders in their fields. Secondly, I hope they see the importance of donors who are committed to Auburn and its students’ success. Auburn can’t depend on state support and tuition increases to remain a leading institution.

John & Will Vandiver Memorial Scholarship

John & Will Vandiver Memorial Scholarship

A conversation with Clay Vandiver.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
Three generations of Vandivers have attended Auburn University, dating back to John and Will Vandiver’s grandfather, who finished his degree in 1952. The love for Auburn dates back especially to John and Will’s father and mother, who attended Auburn in the ’70s. Their father walked onto the Auburn football team at a point in time when there was a still a junior varsity program. Tragically John and Will Vandiver lost their lives in an automobile accident in December 2002 at the ages of 16 and 12, and never got a chance to enjoy this outstanding university. They both had aspirations to attend Auburn and it seemed very fitting to look for a way to remember these two young people in a way that would preserve their name at an institution like Auburn, which has meant so much to our family.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
John Vandiver attended Buckhorn High School which is in New Market, Ala. (near Huntsville, Ala.). Will Vandiver would have passed through the halls of this fine high school as well. The scholarship recipient each year is a Buckhorn High School senior and we are so thankful that a new Buckhorn High graduate gets a chance to experience one of the finest colleges in the South.

Joseph B. Sarver Scholarship

Joseph B. Sarver Scholarship

A conversation with David and Valerie Sarver.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
This scholarship was created in honor of our late father, Joseph B. Sarver, founder of the Auburn University Alumni Association in 1951.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
He founded our Alumni Association, and devoted his life to Auburn. He was Executive Secretary of the Alumni Association, as well as Director of the Development Fund. He was instrumental in raising the capital for the building of the Ralph Brown Draughon Library, the James E. Greene School of Veterinary Medicine, and many other projects in a 26-year career.

Our childhood memories of him include his weekly travels with Coach Ralph Jordan around the state and country in building the Alumni Association, and the pride in Auburn that had to be rebuilt after period of lethargy fomented by a few really poor football seasons. They planned to build both the athletic and academic programs to go hand-in-hand. His accomplishments are too numerous to mention here, but can be found in brief summery from the Alabama State legislatures proclamation upon his receiving his Honorary Doctorate from Auburn University in the last year of his life.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
An appreciation of devotion to Auburn, and their responsibilities as they go on in life to remember their formative years at Auburn and how significant it is to their overall outlook on life.

Kane and Hudson Kelly Endowed Scholarship

Kane and Hudson Kelly Endowed Scholarship

A conversation with Ken Kelly.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
This scholarship was established to help students who want to major in finance and go make their mark in the business world. I also wanted to establish this scholarship in a way that a deserving student would receive this scholarship for their entire four years of undergraduate studies. The biggest reason I chose to establish this scholarship was to help leave a legacy for my son and grandson to follow, thus the naming of the scholarship. I want them to remain a part of the University long after I am gone. Although my son graduated from a Texas university, he lives orange and blue. My grandson, who is five now, is a different story; his goal is be a marine biologist.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
I am honored to give back and help students achieve their degree and goal. I was raised in the country where hard work was expected from you in order to achieve and help your family. I believe in a strong work ethic and that the recipient of this scholarship deserves this honor, for they too have worked hard and have, by evidenced in their previous school work in high school, established a work ethic for themselves. My last words are from a movie from several years ago, Rudy. Coach Dan Devine said, “No one, I mean no one, comes into our house and pushes us around. Do your job, no excuses.” That has been my motto for years and that is the motto I believe each student who receives this scholarship has within themselves.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
I have too many to name, from Pat Sullivan to Terry Beasley, Bo over the Top, Punt Bama Punt. However, I will state that the Saturday “Bummer” came to play on the Plains and to hear AD Housel say, “We are finally equal” was a great moment in Auburn history. But us Auburn people knew we were always better than those from up north. After all, everyone knows that the only sign of intelligence in Tuscaloosa is the one that says “Auburn 140 miles!”

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope recipients have the chance to give back to the College of Business at Auburn. Don’t forget how you have been helped to achieve your goals and dreams and reciprocate when the time is right to help those coming after each recipient of this scholarship. War Eagle, and I wish each recipient success today, tomorrow, and in the future.

Ken Kelly Annual Scholarship

Ken Kelly Annual Scholarship

A conversation with Ken Kelly.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
My goal in life while growing up in Wetumpka, Ala. was to become a veterinarian. Unfortunately, family circumstances changed that goal. However, I did not want someone that had the opportunity to become a veterinarian to lose their lifelong dream. So I established this scholarship to help offset some of the annual costs of vet school. I also believed that my goal would be achieved through other individuals. My take on this is that every student that receives this scholarship and becomes a veterinarian allows a small part of me to be a veterinarian within them.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
I would like each recipient to know that there are individuals out there who believe in helping students achieve their goals. It is not about the amount of money designated for these scholarships, it is more about the heartfelt thanks toward these students who are willing to risk and create their own opportunities. For that, country people like myself just want to say thanks, and we do that by giving back to an organization that means a lot to those of us who create scholarships to benefit deserving, hardworking, overachieving individuals. I sum it up by saying, a great work ethic needs to be recognized, and this is my recognition.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
Although I did not complete a degree at Auburn and my BBA and MBA were completed in Texas, I never lost sight of my love and the family relationships I made with other Auburn students. Those are moments in time you do not forget. A lot of students went to Auburn from Wetumpka High School and those friendships are alive today. So when the slogan is “Family,” it is true. There’s nothing better than rolling Toomer’s Corner with a fresh lemonade in hand. On the funny side, I will not say if there was anything else in the lemonade at the time, after all we were all young once and made let’s say, not the best decisions sometimes. I do miss the Wreck Tech parades from many years ago.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
People you don’t even know are willing to invest in your future, and a great work ethic has its rewards. Also, by people like me giving back, it may set a precedent for the recipients to do the same when the time is right. After all, it is meaningful for the recipient to receive a monetary gift, but how more meaningful will it be for a recipient to reciprocate back to the College of Veterinary Medicine to help a future young student.

Kevin Bell and Shelby Scholarship in the College of Veterinary Medicine

Kevin Bell and Shelby Scholarship in the College of Veterinary Medicine

A conversation with Debbie Allen.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
I created this annual scholarship in the College of Veterinary Medicine as a 24th birthday gift for my son, Kevin Bell.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
If you want to do something badly enough, it can be done no matter the obstacles in your path. While Kevin had to deal with devastating physical handicaps, he graduated from Auburn University at the age of 19 with a degree in psychology and then at 21 he added a degree in Spanish.

Kevin had an aide dog, Shelby, who took every class Kevin took. Shelby was his constant companion who allowed him freedom—the ability to go out on his own. The AU Vet School took care of Shelby through the years.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
When Kevin got ready to graduate in 2000, the Registrar’s Office asked if they could give his aide dog, Shelby, a diploma as well when they went across the stage. Kevin’s reaction was swift and sure—NO! When I said to him that Shelby had been in every class Kevin had taken and asked him why he didn’t want Shelby to receive a degree he said, “That dog slept through every class, I earned that degree!”

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
If you want to get an education, you can overcome any obstacle in your way. It may be hard, it may be an arduous road, but it can be done. Kevin’s memory will live on through others who receive this scholarship and I hope they can give back to others as he did.

Kevin Bell Memorial Endowed Scholarship in the College of Education

Kevin Bell Memorial Endowed Scholarship in the College of Education

A conversation with Debbie Allen.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
This scholarship is in memory of my son, Kevin Bell, who valued education above all else.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
While Kevin had devastating physical handicaps, his drive and determination led him to two degrees at Auburn, one in psychology and one in Spanish. It was his dream to teach Spanish at the high school level. His body gave out before he could realize his dream of teaching.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope students gain the feeling that they, too, can give back to those who come after them.

King Edsel (Ed) Williams, Jr. Endowed Scholarship in Journalism

King Edsel (Ed) Williams, Jr. Endowed Scholarship in Journalism

A conversation with King Edsel (Ed) Williams, Jr.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
This scholarship was formed in appreciation to Auburn students—past, present and future—who have meant to much to me.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
I spent 30 years as a professor of journalism, 23 of those years as faculty adviser of the Auburn Plainsman. I was on the journalism faculty from 1983 until my retirement in 2013.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
The impact I’ve had on the lives of Auburn students comes to me practically daily through email and Facebook messages from my former students, both in the classroom and the Auburn Plainsman.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope recipients gain a love and appreciation of journalism. Whether journalism is through print or online, there will always be news to report and stories to tell. Journalists will always “gather the facts and tell the stories.”

Larson-Peterson Memorial Women

Larson-Peterson Memorial Women's Philanthropy Board Endowed Scholarship

A conversation with Carol Warfield
Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
It is a tribute to the memory of my parents and grandparents who put such a high value on higher education, even though my father and grandparents never had the chance to go to college.

What would you want recipients of this scholarship to know about you or the person(s) for whom it is named?
The Larson and Peterson families sacrificed in order that their children could attend college. In memory of them, this scholarship is established to help other students achieve a college education.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
I have been a faculty member and administrator at Auburn for 40 years and I am proud to be a part of providing an education and a future for Auburn students.

What do you hope your recipients gain through receiving this scholarship?
I hope they gain pride in their accomplishments and a desire to give back themselves once they graduate and enter their professional lives.

Leischuck-Reaves Endowed Scholarship

Leischuck-Reaves Endowed Scholarship

A conversation with Dr. Gerald S. Leischuck
Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
My late wife, Emily Reaves Leischuck, and I have always been teachers at heart and believers that everyone should be encouraged to get as much formal education as possible. Knowing that attending college is increasingly costly, we wanted to provide funds to assist others gain the benefits of an undergraduate education. Over the years, Auburn University was exceedingly good to us, so we felt it important to say thank you by supporting a scholarship program in honor of our parents, who made it possible for us to obtain baccalaureate degrees: Claude and Emily Tyson Reaves and Steve and Nellie Leischuck.

What would you want recipients of this scholarship to know about you or the person(s) for whom it is named?
Neither Emily nor I earned undergraduate degrees here but we both did graduate studies at Auburn. We both enjoyed extended rewarding careers at Auburn University, where we came to realize just how special the institution has become. Our roots are elsewhere but Auburn University captured our hearts.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
As an Auburn University employee from 1964 until retirement in 1997, I was privileged to work closely with six Auburn presidents. During that period I was helped, encouraged, and promoted by many outstanding Auburn people displaying and living the Auburn spirit—warmth, goodness, and friendliness.

What do you hope your recipients gain through receiving this scholarship?
I hope our recipients gain the assurance that Auburn men and women are a caring and supportive family, wherein each of us strives to do what we can to make the university a better place and to make it accessible to the young women and men who choose to study here. If the student has the will, then it behooves us to help them find ways to develop their skills and talents to the fullest.

Linda and Terry McCartney "New Day" Scholarship

Linda and Terry McCartney "New Day" Scholarship

A conversation with Terry McCartney
Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
We originally wanted to include kids who had a particular profile in our estate via a planned gift. That profile included kids who came from dysfunctional family situations and may have included abuse, neglect, foster care or other similar circumstances. Auburn University is a stable, enduring institution that will likely exist indefinitely into the future. At this time we expect our estate gift to be large, and we wanted the gift proceeds to have a long life-span. We also decided to start with a current gift. Lastly, I have had a long-term relationship with Auburn, including living for a short period in Auburn as a child, returning for my college career including graduation, and meeting my wife, who is a two-time Auburn graduate. So Auburn University met all of our criteria as a place to serve even beyond our lifetime.

What would you want recipients of this scholarship to know about you or the person(s) for whom it is named?
We are interested in supporting them and seeing them succeed in life. We don’t have kids/grandkids but we have been blessed to have resources, which we want to share with young people who are striving to make a contribution in life by obtaining a good education and overall collegiate life experience.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
My family moved to Auburn in 1960 for a short while and then Opelika, where my father worked for Southern Bell Telephone, and that was the beginning point of my Auburn relationship. I returned for college in 1970 and was a struggling student. In Fall 1974 I had a class with a girl who was roomate with my roomate’s girl friend. Forty-two years later we are still together. Linda was an excellent student and obtained an undergraduate degree in math. Following that she obtained a Master’s in Industrial Engineering, which was the home of the Computer Science curriculum. She was one of a very view female engineering students at the time.

So I’ve seen a lot of football games but rarely attend in person now. I am interested in promoting Auburn’s successes beyond just athletics, so I am more likely to want to tell people about the Auburn grad who is CEO of the most successful company in the history of the world (Apple) than I am to talk football. (Sometimes a little of both).

What do you hope your recipients gain through receiving this scholarship?
I hope this gives them a start towards completion of a life experience phase that will enable them to achieve their goals in their next phase of life, including career, family, and citizenship goals. And I hope they know that any struggles or misfortunes that they may have experienced in the past will be behind them when they complete their degree and move on to a “New Day.”

L. Nick Davis Endowed Scholarship in the College of Business

L. Nick Davis Endowed Scholarship in the College of Business

A conversation with L. Nick Davis.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
I believe in Auburn and I believe in Auburn students: while I studied at Auburn, I worked three jobs to support myself and pay my tuition, books, and fees. I want today’s students to be able to focus fully on academics, extracurricular activities, social activities, athletics, and frankly, just have fun. As I tell my nieces and nephews, “It is your job to make excellent grades and enjoy your college years.” You may not be able to realize it while you are here at Auburn, but this is the time of your life. Love and cherish every moment.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
This scholarship was established in my name: I am happy to be able to give back to this great institution that prepared me well and offered me the opportunity to be financially secure enough to pass it along to the next generations. It is a privilege and an honor to be able to do so.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
My earliest memories are of coming to Auburn for game day weekends; this was before the completion of I-85 from Atlanta, where we lived. The five-hour trip here was full of long, winding roads, building the anticipation of the big game on Saturday. I remember going to the area outside of the locker rooms and seeing the coaches and the players. I still have all my programs from those early years, many with autographs of the Auburn greats: Shug Jordan, Pat Sullivan, and Terry Beasley, among many others. Auburn is an integral part of my life from my earliest memories, through my adolescence, my college years and the adult years. I believe in Auburn and love it.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope this scholarship gives the gift of time: time to focus on being an Auburn student and enjoying all it has to offer.

Lowell Ledbetter Alumni Endowed Scholarship

Lowell Ledbetter Alumni Endowed Scholarship

A conversation with Steven W. Dowling and Laura Ledbetter Dowling.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
This scholarship honors Laura’s father, Lowell Ledbetter, for his love for Auburn, his years of service to Auburn, and for instilling a deep love for Auburn in his children and grandchildren. To date, both of his children and their spouses have degrees from AU, and ten of his grandchildren and their spouses either have degrees from AU or are enrolled at AU working on degrees.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
Lowell Ledbetter got two degrees from AU, and then worked for AU until he retired. At the age of 82 he still watches or listens to AU sports games and keeps up with goings on at Auburn. He still serves others, and is still pastoring others, and is devoted to his savior Jesus Christ.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
Our favorite Auburn story is that we (Steve and Laura) met there. Our oldest daughter and her husband also met at Auburn. Laura and her brother, Chuck, grew up on Auburn’s campus, as their father, Lowell Ledbetter, worked as Foreign Student Advisor in Mary E. Martin Hall with Dean James E. Foy, and later at Foy Student Union Building as the Director. Their mother, Linda Ledbetter, worked for the Alumni Association for several years, and then in Food Services at War Eagle Cafeteria, Terrell Dining Hall, and finally at Sewell Hall. Laura and Chuck were allowed to play all over campus after school and on weekends, and considered it as familiar as home. Their father started allowing Laura to check out books on his card at Ralph Brown Draughon library when she was 12, which reinforced her love of books and reading, and paved the way for her to major in English at AU. Laura also started working at War Eagle Cafeteria when she was 14 and continued working there through her freshman year. We are thankful that our family is also a part of our Auburn Family!

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
We hope they gain the same caliber of education and level of personal growth that we did.

Lt. Gen. Forrest S. McCartney Endowed Scholarship

Lt. Gen. Forrest S. McCartney Endowed Scholarship

A conversation with Magi Sizemore
Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
My mother began it to honor my father, who graduated from Auburn in 1952. He was a space pioneer, a lieutenant general in the Air Force, and Director of Kennedy Space Center when America returned to flight following the Challenger tragedy.

What would you want recipients of this scholarship to know about you or the person(s) for whom it is named?
He was kind, loved people, and believed everyone should have the best education possible.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
My grandparents both graduated from Auburn. My grandfather was in the class of 1923, and my grandmother was in the class of 1924. She was one of the first female graduates. When I was 2, my dad taught me the Auburn fight song, so I have always cheered for Auburn.

What do you hope your recipients gain through receiving this scholarship?
I hope they receive the best education possible so that they are successful in life, as well as become kind, humble people.

Mabon E. (Bud) Pugh Scholarship

Mabon E. (Bud) Pugh Scholarship

A conversation with Nancy and Allan Bissinger.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
Allan and Nancy established this scholarship to honor Nancy’s father and to provide an ongoing opportunity for students to enjoy the benefits of an Auburn University education in engineering.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
Mabon E. (Bud) Pugh came to Auburn from Navco, Ala. (just outside of Mobile) and earned his bachelor’s degree in animal husbandry in 1951. After working on a ranch in Fairhope, he returned to Auburn in 1957 with his young family to pursue his dream of becoming a veterinarian. Dr. Pugh graduated in 1962 with his DVM degree and subsequently practiced veterinary medicine in Pensacola, Fla., where he is now retired.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
Nancy was born at the Auburn University Infirmary while her father pursued his bachelor’s degree and returned to elementary school at Samford Elementary School while he finished his DVM degree. Allan (BSEE ‘75) and Nancy (BS ’73, MISE ’10, PhD ’15) met at Auburn when he was an electrical engineering student and she was an industrial engineering graduate student. They were married soon thereafter Allan’s graduation. They have three grown children and the youngest is also an Auburn graduate (BS ’07).

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
We hope to ease a student’s financial burden so that he/she is free to enjoy and take full advantage of the Auburn student experience.

Mack and Jamie Freeman Endowment in the College of Architecture

Mack and Jamie Freeman Endowment in the College of Architecture

A conversation with Mack and Jamie Freeman.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
We would like to give young men and women an opportunity to experience a wonderful world of college and education. We love to help very talented college students who may not have the financial needs to support their endeavors. We hope each one receiving funds from our endowments will become better Auburn students, alumni, and Americans.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
We consider them our family because we do not have children of our own.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
Mack grew up under the roof of a Navy father and an ALABAMA FAN! He chose Auburn because Alabama did not have a College of Architecture. In his first year, he stayed in his dorm and studied during football games while the defending national champs played in the stadium where he could look out his window and see the crowd and hear the roars. Now, Mack is one of the most loyal Auburn fans in sports and supportive of academics and his College of Architecture. He has only missed one home game in 40+ years. Jamie has missed two games. And yes, as an architect, one of his most treasured projects for him and his firm was to be architects for the East Upper Deck and Suites completed in 1987 under the leadership of Coach Pat Dye. The Aquatic Center was another athletic project he loved so much. Mack and his wife, Jamie, married at the beginning of his junior year in architecture. Jamie was secretary to the Director of Admissions and attended classes early morning and late afternoon. Because of a life-threatening accident in 1962 when he and his ROTC colleagues were on their way back to Auburn from six weeks of officers’ training camp in Fort Belvoir, Va., his graduation in Architecture was delayed until 1965. Auburn taught us both to grow during success and adversity. Just as Oliver Goldsmith wrote in his poem about a small village in Ireland, “Sweet Auburn! loveliest village of the plain,” Auburn is truly the loveliest village of the plain; our second home.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
We hope students can use this scholarship to achieve their dreams in life.

Magen Kristen Nix Memorial Scholarship

Magen Kristen Nix Memorial Scholarship

A conversation with Dr. Patricia R. Nix.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
My granddaughter loved Auburn. When she was killed in an automobile accident while a freshman at Auburn, I thought it was a fitting way to honor her memory.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
Magen was a smart, loving person with a wicked sense of humor. She loved to have fun. She also studied hard and planned to be a pharmacist.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
My husband and I lived in Auburn from 1965-1967. He finished school and I taught school. We lived in married student housing with two young children. At the end of the month, we didn’t have much money left for groceries. All the married students in our building would pool our food and have potluck dinners toward the end of the month. We didn’t have to do without food.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope the recipients study hard and do well because they don’t have to worry so much about paying their tuition.

Margaret Atchison Hathaway Scholarship in the School Forestry and Wildlife Sciences

Margaret Atchison Hathaway Scholarship in the School Forestry and Wildlife Sciences

A conversation with Kay Hathaway Jones ’62.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
I wanted to honor my mother, who was responsible for me coming to Auburn, and at the same time provide financial support to another to attend Auburn. Education is an important means to broaden our understanding of the world we live in, as well as the people who live in it.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
My mother and I shared a love of Auburn, and a love of nature, especially wildlife. My maternal grandfather, Rose E. Atchison, also has a scholarship in his honor in forestry, and my maternal grandmother, Hester Wear Atchison, has a scholarship in her honor in education. These members of my family all share in a love of nature and education, especially of Auburn.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
I attended AU for four years graduating with a BS in accounting/business administration. I was a member of Kappa Delta sorority, and was elected senior senator in student government. Auburn is a special place that radiates with a warm spirit you will rediscover on each occasion you return: there is no other place like it. War Eagle!

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope the recipients of this scholarship will work hard, receive a degree, go out into the workplace and find satisfaction and success, then give back to Auburn to help someone else.

Margaret Cox Coker Endowed Scholarship in the College of Education

Margaret Cox Coker Endowed Scholarship in the College of Education

A conversation with L. Nick Davis.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
I believe in Auburn and I believe in Auburn students: while I studied at Auburn, I worked three jobs to support myself and pay my tuition, books, and fees. I want today’s students to be able to focus fully on academics, extracurricular activities, social activities, athletics, and frankly, just have fun. As I tell my nieces and nephews, “It is your job to make excellent grades and enjoy your college years.” You may not be able to realize it while you are here at Auburn, but this is the time of your life. Love and cherish every moment.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
This scholarship was named for my grandmother, Margaret Cox Coker. She was a proud graduate of the Auburn University College of Education. She earned her undergrad and master’s degrees while working full-time. She was the first generation in her family to attend college. She came to Auburn with virtually no parental support; she worked full-time. She believed in work, hard work. She retired after 30-plus years of preparing future generations of learners as a home economics teacher. She knew Auburn had served her well and she wanted to share her passion for education and Auburn with others. She often spoke about her experience at Auburn and how that time prepared her to be the best, expect the best, and get the best out of her students. She earned the respect of her fellow man; she excelled in her career, earning numerous awards; she held statewide and nationwide leadership positions. Like most of her generation, she was self-disciplined, had a spirit that was not afraid of what was before her, and had a determination to prepare herself to meet the challenges of the future. She prepared herself financially to live a full life into her twilight years, enjoying international travel and continuing to quench her thirst for experiencing new things and people whose lives were very different from her own. She believed in the human touch - affecting the lives of countless other educators, students, and her own family. My parents attended Auburn, as well as many in my generation. We have one in the fourth generation who was graduated from Auburn and several attending now. She learned what many of us have learned-she learned to love Auburn, she learned to love the Auburn Creed and lived by the Creed. And because my grandmother believed in these things, I believe in Auburn and love it.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
My earliest memories are of coming to Auburn for game day weekends; this was before the completion of I-85 from Atlanta, where we lived. The five-hour trip here was full of long, winding roads, building the anticipation of the big game on Saturday. I remember going to the area outside of the locker rooms and seeing the coaches and the players. I still have all my programs from those early years, many with autographs of the Auburn greats: Shug Jordan, Pat Sullivan, and Terry Beasley, among many others. Auburn is an integral part of my life from my earliest memories, through my adolescence, my college years and the adult years. I believe in Auburn and love it.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope this scholarship gives the gift of time: time to focus on being an Auburn student and enjoying all it has to offer.

Marks Family Scholarship

Marks Family Scholarship

A conversation with Gilbert Lynn and Cheryl Marks.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
Auburn is a great university where I received the foundation upon which my career has been built. I gained much and simply wish to give back and encourage students to pursue careers in science and math.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
I’m a physician with a subspecialty in infectious diseases. I work in R&D for a major pharmaceutical company where we are committed to creating new medicines to combat a wide range of unmet medical needs globally.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
I returned to the campus recently with my mother and father. My dad graduated from Auburn and I wanted him and my mom to see the progress that has been made across the campus, the manner in which “the tragedy with the trees” was handled, and for them to see the commemorative brick that was placed in their honor in front of the alumni building. A noteworthy past, a strong present, and an exceptionally bright future are in store for the expanding Auburn Family.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I want the students to experience having a barrier removed in their quest to exploring a future in the field of science and mathematics. Innovation, focus on quality, and a drive to achieve in this space is critical for our future and the future of all.

Martin Family Endowed Scholarship

Martin Family Endowed Scholarship

A conversation with Herb and Marynm Martin.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
I am a graduate and feel that Auburn’s education prepared me well for what success we have enjoyed. We think education is a key for helping make our future world a better place and we are committed to helping others in this way. We also had two children graduate there and have strong ties to Auburn through the generations.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
We like to travel, and really enjoy how folks’ faces brighten when we can share a War Eagle at random places; we’ve enjoyed those moments in Belize, in Puerto Rico, and across the US. It truly represents what we all know to be the “Auburn Spirit.” My wife is an LSU grad, but she’s fully bought into our Auburn Family, All In. For the three other AU grads in the family, that’s no problem of course!

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope our scholarship recipients grow to share in the Auburn Spirit as their learning grows, and are well-placed to succeed and contribute in the future.

Martin L. Beck, Jr. Endowed Scholarship

Martin L. Beck, Jr. Endowed Scholarship

A conversation with Virginia H. Beck.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
Martin believed in hard work and education, and he loved young people. I established the Martin L. Beck, Jr. Endowed Scholarship in 2012 in memory of my husband.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
Martin was born in Bisbee, Ariz. on June 30, 1925. His family moved to Auburn in 1928 when his father joined the faculty in the College of Education. Martin grew up in Auburn where he attended grade and high school. Upon graduation in 1943, he worked for a time in a wind tunnel at Langley Field, Va., the predecessor of NASA. He entered the Air Force later that year and transferred to the infantry in 1944. He was captured on a night patrol behind the enemy lines in January 1945 and was liberated in April of that year. Martin studied Engineering Physics at Auburn, graduating in March 1949. His first job was with the Naval Ordnance Laboratory. He continued his interest in science and read scientific articles throughout his life. He returned to Auburn in 1954 to work with his father at Beck’s Turf Nursery Co. He became owner of the company in 1961 and operated it until his retirement in 1990. His engineering education enabled him to develop several machines for use in the turf business which he patented, manufactured and sold through Beck Manufacturing Co. Martin passed away on January 4, 2012.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
A native of Greensboro, Ala., I earned the BS and MS degrees in Home Economics and the EdS degree in Adult Education. My thirty-three year career was with the Alabama Cooperative Extension Service as Extension Agent in Washington, Escambia and Clarke counties and as Extension Specialist at the state level at Auburn University. I retired in 1993 and continue to live in the Loveliest Village. My “War Eagle” moment — I was a member of the first graduating class of Auburn University in March 1960!

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope the scholarship recipients find a successful and enjoyable career and, of course, keep the Auburn Spirit!

Mary Louise S. Roy Scholarships in Education

Mary Louise S. Roy Scholarships in Education

A conversation with Kenneth B. Roy Jr.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
I grew up in Auburn; my dad was on the faculty; my brother, sister and I graduated from Auburn; my three daughters attended Auburn; two of my grandchildren graduated from Auburn, so I have a long relationship with Auburn. Also I was financially able to fund the three scholarships, and I wanted to see the recipients.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
I would hope that the recipients would be able to fund a scholarship.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
I was a member of the first NROTC class at Auburn.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope the recipients will enjoy returning to Auburn for events as I have.

Michael P. Thomas Endowed Scholarship

Michael P. Thomas Endowed Scholarship

A conversation with Michael P. Thomas
Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
I felt it was the best way for me to give back to Auburn and to provide a small level of financial help to a student from Florida to lessen his/her debt at graduation.

What would you want recipients of this scholarship to know about you or the person(s) for whom it is named?
Although not born in Florida, I have lived in the state most of my life. After four years in the U.S. Navy and Grad School at the University of Florida, I spent a wonderful 28-year career at Harris Corporation, headquartered in Melbourne Fla. The accounting knowledge I gained at AU served me very well in my career. The last 16 years I was the Controller of a $2B business unit, the largest unit of our $5-6B company. I retired in 2010 at age 55 and my wife Rhonda and I are loving our retirement lives.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
I attended Auburn on a Navy ROTC scholarship. I grew up in a very pro-military family at a time, in the late 60’s, when the military was enduring the unpopularity of the Vietnam war. I chose to go out of state to school because the Florida universities, at that time, had factions that opposed ROTC on campus. More importantly, I knew a few people from my hometown who were attending, or had attended, Auburn and were overwhelmingly positive in their love and respect. My first visit confirmed that I belonged in the AU environment. Like most, I grew to love everything about Auburn and maintain those strong feelings today.

What do you hope your recipients gain through receiving this scholarship?
The cost of attending college, especially out of state, can be daunting to many. I hope this scholarship provides a small bit of help to a student in Accounting/Business, preferably from Florida, become an Auburn person for life. I also hope it will encourage the recipients to give back in some fashion during their working years and beyond.

Molly Stone Given Endowed Scholarship

Molly Stone Given Endowed Scholarship

A conversation with Molly Given (pictured at left, with her freshman-year roommate Ali Stefanek at right).

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
Creating a scholarship at Auburn actually came by me in way of a gift, which was such a wonderful present! I love that I was able to choose criteria for who I could help benefit in the future.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
I had the most wonderful college experience at Auburn, and I hope that by receiving my scholarship, students will be one step closer to having the same amazing experience that I did.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
Auburn has always been a part of my family. I have spent my whole life attending football games and truly feel like I grew up inside the Conference Center. My grandparents were super involved in Auburn, and my parents are still incredibly involved. When it was time for me to make my college decision, it was a no-brainer that I would be attending Auburn. My four years at Auburn were the absolute best years of my life. Growing up, my father would always tell me that driving into Auburn made him feel like he was coming home. I never really understood why, but now that I am on the other side, I totally agree. It is so sad knowing that my time in college there was a thing of the past. Auburn has meant the world to me, and I hope that it ends up meaning just as much to every other student.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope my recipients gain a more stress-free college experience with knowing that some financial aid has been taken care of. I was blessed to not have to worry financially any through college, and I hope that I give a little part of that to many other students along the way!

Nelda K. Lee Endowed Scholarship in Aerospace Engineering

Nelda K. Lee Endowed Scholarship in Aerospace Engineering

A conversation with Nelda Lee
Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
I wanted a way to give back and to help a student get a degree in Aerospace Engineering.

What would you want recipients of this scholarship to know about you or the person(s) for whom it is named?
Being an Auburn graduate is awesome, but more importantly very much respected in the business and social world. When you leave Auburn and enter the work force around the world and you tell others you have a degree from Auburn University, they will listen and respect your education and knowledge. I worked 45 years for a major aircraft manufacturing company and with graduates from many, many universities. Auburn Engineering equipped me to work with the best and hold my own with the best. Get your degree and be proud! Never stop learning.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
My Auburn degree made all the difference in the world and carried me through my career and beyond. I spent five years at Auburn in Aerospace Engineering and 45 years applying it to an awesome aviation career with a major aircraft company. It all fit together and each complemented the other.

What do you hope your recipients gain through receiving this scholarship?
I want them to gain the best education possible and to fulfill goals and to establish a firm foundation for an awesome career. I also hope to generate a love for Auburn and therefore create an opportunity to give back and keep the scholarship program alive and well.

Pao-Sen Chi Memorial Scholarship

Pao-Sen Chi Memorial Scholarship

A conversation with Yun-Hwa Peggy Hsieh.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
Auburn has a very special place in my heart! I started my academic career at Auburn University and had served 10 years from an assistant professor to full professor of food science. That was the most memorable time in my life.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
I established the endowment of Pao-Sen Chi Memorial Scholarship in honor and memory of my deceased parents for their generosity and belief in education. My father believed strongly that education was vital to the completion of individuals and society as a whole, that it challenged old concepts and opened minds and hearts to new knowledge and experiences. He believed that the result of these changes would be a deeper understanding of morality and a better quality of life for all. Throughout their lives, I vividly remembered that my parents sacrificially and anonymously supported numerous young people of less fortune throughout their educational careers in Taiwan. This scholarship serves as a lasting tribute to the vision and legacy of my parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pao-Sen Chi.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
I started my academic career at AU in 1993 as an assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science, College of Human Sciences. My mother passed away earlier in 1986 and my father visited my family in Auburn after his retirement from Taiwan during the winter holiday break in 1994. My father loved everything about Auburn and was so pleased that I chose to be an educator. We had such a wonderful time during his visit. Very sadly, he died from a heart attack right after this trip on January 11, 1995. Since his unexpected sudden death, his word of admonishment to me for being a devoted mother, wife, and educator has been always ringing in my ears. I determined to remember and honor my father by doing my very best for the family and on my job. Auburn became the most special and memorable place in my life where I shared the most precious days with my father before his passing; started my first job in academia; worked with wonderful students; made lifetime good colleague friends; cheered almost every Tiger game for a decade; received my first US patent; and made the first license agreement of commercializing of our research products. I left AU in 2003 for Florida State University, for a family reason to join my husband there; however, due to continuing AU research at FSU, I have kept a close working relationship with AU for all these years, resulting in joined license deals between AU and FSU. A number of AU licensed technologies are on the international market for consumer protection from food adulteration, food allergy and prion diseases. I am currently serving as a member on the Nutrition and Dietetics Advisory Board and Women’s Philanthropy Board, College of Human Sciences, Auburn University. War Eagle!

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope all scholarship recipients will receive support, encouragement, and honor as they deserve, and they will also be able to support and encourage others someday when they are ready. Passing on the spirit of giving is a blessing to many.

Paul and Mary Williamson Family Scholarships

Paul and Mary Williamson Family Scholarships

A conversation with Greg and Rosemary Greaves.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
Whether it’s our health, communication, or everyday conveniences in life, these students will shape our future world. And I can’t think of a better investment than the education of a future Auburn University graduate!

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
The scholarship is named for my parents, to honor their desire for the absolute best for me!

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
I believe my Auburn experience directly affected the values I hold true today. I am proud of the strong work ethic and dedication that have been instilled in me by family, friends, and educators. I cherish these relationships because these individuals saw more in me than I saw in myself … especially while at Auburn. I love Auburn, and I want to help others have their own Auburn experience!

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
I hope you have the opportunity to truly embrace all the knowledge wrapped up in the college experience. The lessons you will learn while at Auburn, whether academic or professional and personal values, will carry forward and shape your future. Soak up all you can!

Paul B. Fraser Memorial Scholarship in Architecture

Paul B. Fraser Memorial Scholarship in Architecture

A conversation with Polly G. Fraser and Paul S. Scharff.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
Paul Fraser, a sophomore in the School of Architecture at Auburn, died in January 1990 of meningitis. We, his mother and stepfather, wanted students with good grades and financial need to be able to get the education that Paul would have benefited from had he survived.

We are proud that we have been able to help so many students. They represent many positives that Paul Fraser stood for in his 20 years.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
Paul loved his almost two years at Auburn. He made good friends in the School of Architecture, his fraternity, and the wonderful people in the architecture department. He has been gone for 25 years but never forgotten by family and friends. This scholarship means he will always be remembered. The scholarship was established in 1991 by his mother Polly Fraser, his stepfather Paul Scharff, and his great-aunt Adria Spielberger to help students reach their dreams.

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
Auburn fulfilled Paul Fraser’s expectation of college and of the School of Architecture—he was happy with the entire experience. In the early days of the scholarship we were privileged to be involved with the selection of the recipients and in some cases establish relationships that continue still.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
Hopefully this scholarship will provide the ability to have an easier time getting the quality education in architecture that Auburn offers, and to make contributions to the world around them. Some recipients have gone on to other careers, but always using their years in architecture school as a leg up.

Pete Cerny Endowed Scholarship in Aerospace Engineering

Pete Cerny Endowed Scholarship in Aerospace Engineering

A conversation with Peggy Cerny.

Why did you choose to create a scholarship at Auburn University?
My husband was an Auburn aerospace engineering grad, Class of 1969. When he died suddenly of a massive heart attack in 2008 at age 62, some of his fraternity brothers decided to establish an engineering scholarship in his name. Our family is proud to continue the scholarship in Pete’s name.

What would you want the recipients of this scholarship to know about the person for whom it is named?
Pete Cerny was a 1969 Auburn University aerospace engineering grad. He went on to get his master’s in Operations Research elsewhere and completed nearly all the course work for a PhD. He came to the US (Huntsville, Ala.) in 1957 with his family when his dad was selected as a member of the Wernher von Braun rocket team, which designed the Saturn rocket that put man on the moon. I guess you could say he was “born” to be an engineer and shoot for the stars. He worked on many space projects, including the real Star Wars program and the Space and Missile Defense initiative. Pete served on the Auburn Aerospace Engineering Council headed by Dr. John Cochran. He loved Auburn, was a football season ticket holder for over 40 years, and managed to fit in an active social life while studying engineering. He was a wonderful spouse (to an Auburn grad), and a terrific father of two children (both Auburn grads). He was a very humble man and would be honored (and probably a little embarrassed) at having this scholarship established in is name. Pete never sought the limelight, but was recognized many times for his engineering and leadership achievements. He would probably say to the recipient: study hard, enjoy all that Auburn has to offer, take pride in being an Auburn engineering grad and, above all, “War Eagle!”

Tell us about your Auburn story, favorite tradition, a “War Eagle!” moment, or what Auburn has meant to you.
Pete and I met on a blind date to the Auburn/Georgia football game in the fall of 1966, when we were sophomores. We enjoyed three more great years on campus together. He proposed to me on the lawn of Samford Hall with a ring from Ware Jewelers in 1969, the year we graduated. We made sure to schedule our wedding for the off weekend between the Auburn/Georgia game and the Auburn/Alabama game (back when there was an off weekend). We have enough wonderful memories of our time at Auburn to fill a book. Many late nights studying, football from the Shug Jordan era, Dean Cater, Dean Foy, being in attendance at the 17-16 win over Alabama, sitting through tornado warnings in the rain to watch Auburn play Alabama at Legion Field in Birmingham, attending the first Auburn/Alabama home game at Jordan Hare, 40-plus years of Auburn football season tickets and fun tailgates, having wonderful careers thanks to hard work and our Auburn University degrees, and watching with pride as each of our children graduated from Auburn. We are an Auburn family through and through.

What do you hope your recipients gain through this scholarship?
Paying for college is hard. Pete worked part-time while at Auburn and had student loans to pay. Hopefully this scholarship will help a young engineering student be able to focus on pursuing an engineering degree and being the best they can be while at Auburn, while using this scholarship to help out a little bit with the finances.